Cuban: Still ‘No Clue’ on When Sports May Return

Mark Cuban is part of President Trump's sports advisory committee.
By , 670 The Score

(670 The Score) Fresh off a conference call with President Donald Trump and some of the biggest sports power brokers in the country, Mavericks owner Mark Cuban remained uncertain when the NBA and other leagues may return to action as the coronavirus pandemic continues.

"No clue," Cuban said on the McNeil & Parkins Show on 670 The Score on Wednesday afternoon when asked if he had a loose timeline. "And the dumbest thing you can do is put a date on it. Because you just don't know. Again, we're dealing with imperfect information. This is not a situation where you can point to any one certainty."

Cuban is a member of Trump's sports advisory committee that was created to help streamline a plan for the resumption of games and to spark the economy when the spread of the coronavirus slows, and that's why he found himself on the phone call with so many other heavy hitters Wednesday.

"It was more an introductory call and him asking us things that are important to us, and it was pretty unanimous that as soon as it's safe, we want to be able to go play games -- initially without fans," Cuban said. "And so no new ground was broken, but it was great that he was open-minded and listening."

And what was the biggest takeaway from the call?

"Just that there were no surprises," Cuban said. "Everybody was pretty much on the same page. I can't give any details, but the reality is people are concerned, people are uncertain and everybody recognizes that we don't have enough information yet. I guess that's the best way to characterize it -- everybody wants more information.

"The minute we have solutions and standards, we'd love to hear about them."

Cuban did believe that the discussion for when sports may return and the call Wednesday were being driven by science and not just hope, as some have speculated.

"It depends on the details," Cuban said. "If there's science -- and I'm driven by science 100% -- that says we can spray and we can protect and we can quarantine, then more power to them. But if they think it's, 'OK, well, we're just taking a little bit more of a chance and we found this one guy to OK it,' then that's a little bit different. That's where I'd have question marks.

"The science is going to have to lead the way. Once we get confident -- and this is just me speculating -- once we get confident that there's therapies, meaning once somebody gets sick, there's a really good chance that they're going to recover by taking X, Y or Z medicine, then I think we can start to realistically have that discussion."

Cuban did note what he hopes is a silver lining for American society when the pandemic is over.

"I think we'll be a lot more understanding," Cuban said. "I think we'll be much more compassionate.

"We're helping each other more. If you would've asked me hypothetically three months ago if there was a pandemic and we asked everybody to stay inside, I would've said there's no way. We're all just too self-centered, and there's no way people would do it and help each other and stay quarantined. And yet that's what happened ... After the initial craziness, most people are staying inside. Most people are respecting social distancing."

Cuban's comments came on the same day in which Dr. Anthony Fauci, the leading infectious disease expert in the nation and the face of the fight against the coronavirus, expressed optimism that sporting events could be held this summer if players are quarantined in hotels and games are contested without fans in attendance.

"There's a way of doing that," Fauci on a Snapchat show that part of a weeklong interview series. "Nobody comes to the stadium. Put (the players) in big hotels, wherever you want to play, keep them very well surveilled. 

"Have them tested every single week and make sure they don't wind up infecting each other or their family, and just let them play the season out."

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