Judgment Week: What Joe Giglio got wrong

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By SportsRadio 94WIP
Welcome to SportsRadio94WIP's Judgment Week, where we will find out who we were wrong about and ultimately revisit five topics in Philadelphia sports with the benefit of hindsight. 
From Wednesday, July 8th to Wednesday, July 15th submit someone or something that we were wrong about. 
From Monday, July 20th to Friday, July 24th we will spend each day judging, discussing, and debating one of the five most submitted topics that we were wrong about. 

We needed to do this. 

WIP’s Judgment Week will be cathartic. It will be freeing. It will be something that makes us better fans.

Here’s the truth: We’re all wrong about sports. A lot. Me, you, the entire WIP staff, callers, listened. All of us. It’s unpredictable, and sometimes we see things the wrong way or can be stubborn on a take.

And there’s nothing wrong with admitting that, or saying we were wrong. 

Here are some big swings and misses I’ve had over the years.

Chip Kelly: I was all in on Chip Kelly. The Eagles didn’t just get the best offensive mind in college football; they got the next sport-changing head coach. His offense was unstoppable. Culture beats scheme, or whatever that slogan was. I thought the Eagles would dominate for years with this coach. 

I didn’t dig deep enough to recognize how ill-fitted Kelly was in dealing with people. I overestimated his willingness to adjust. Kelly lost me around the end of his second season (asking Mark Sanchez to throw over 50 times in a season-crippling loss in Washington still boggles my mind), and then made things even worse with a ridiculous offseason. 

Kelly did some good things, and won 10 games in back-to-back years. We make him out to be worse than the reality actually was. But I thought the Eagles had a big-time head coach. They didn’t. 

Kevin Kolb: This should come as no surprise considering my affinity for Jared Goff, Kirk Cousins and Nick Foles. I like quarterbacks that throw with touch, timing and anticipation. Kolb had those traits, and I trusted Andy Reid to get the most out of him. Kolb turned out to be a bust, and I was wrong about pushing for him to gain the starting job back over Mike Vick in 2010. I was wrong, but I’ll always wonder if Kolb could have become something good if concussions didn’t ruin his career. 
Nick Foles: Now here’s a name you probably didn't expect to see on this list. I wasn’t always a Foles guy. I thought he was a product of Kelly’s system in 2013. I criticized his foot work and pocket presence in 2014. I was distraught on The Evening Show the night after Carson Wentz’s knee injury in 2017. I didn’t always believe in Foles.

Then, of course, he won me over. The calm. The poise. The accurate deep ball. The clutch moments. Nick Foles got better, is an incredible leader and good quarterback. I was wrong before, but won’t doubt him again.

Markelle Fultz: I mean, look at this dumb tweet. 

Reminder: The Celtics traded away the rights to Markelle Fultz.

— Joe Giglio (@JoeGiglioSports) July 3, 2017

I was mocking the Celtics. I was praising the Sixers. I was in favor of a deal that turned out to be a disaster. In theory, Fultz was the perfect player to add alongside Joel Embiid and Ben Simmons. I couldn’t have guessed (though the pre-draft workout where he couldn’t shoot at all should have been a red flag) he would totally flop. But he did, and I was wrong.

Matt Klentak: “Finally, the Phillies are joining modern baseball!”

That was my first instinct when Klentak was hired after the 2015 season. The Phillies were (very) late to the party on analytics. They needed to change everything and flip the franchise on its head the way Theo Epstein did in Boston and Andrew Friedman did in Tampa Bay. I was excited for the idea of Klentak, but the reality hasn’t been what was hoped.

The farm system isn’t where it needs to be. Klentak’s eye for pitching is suspect. The rebuild was artificially sped up, leaving the team where it is right now and stuck in the middle of trying to contend in a window it created. 

I thought the Phillies had their version of the whiz-kid GM. I was wrong.