Murphy signs Daniel’s Law to protect judges’ personal information

U.S. District Court Judge Esther Salas
New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy signed legislation on Nov. 20, 2020, that protects the home addresses and telephone numbers of judges, prosecutors and law enforcement officers from public disclosure. The bill, known as Daniel’s Law, is named in honor of Daniel Anderl, the late son of U.S. District Court Judge Esther Salas (pictured above). Anderl was shot and killed at the family’s North Jersey home in July by someone who had targeted Salas and other judges. The individual compiled a dossier of personal information about her, including her home address. Photo credit Edwin J. Torres/NJ Governor’s Office via Flickr
By KYW Newsradio

SOUTH JERSEY (KYW Newsradio) — New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy signed a bill on Friday that keeps the home addresses and telephone numbers of judges, prosecutors and law enforcement officers from being publicly available on the internet.

The measure, known as Daniel’s Law, is named after the son of U.S. District Court Judge Esther Salas, Daniel Anderl.

Anderl was shot and killed at the family’s North Jersey home in July by someone who had targeted Salas and other judges. The shooter, a lawyer, compiled a dossier of personal information about Salas, including her home address.

The suspected shooter, 72-year-old Roy Den Hollander, was later found dead by suicide.

“With today’s bill signing, I believe symbolically Daniel is doing what he did for his father and I,” said Salas at the ceremony in Trenton. “He is protecting the lives of countless judicial officers.”

Salas said it was her wish that the law would ensure judges could do their jobs without fear of retribution.

“It is my sincere hope that New Jersey’s trailblazing bipartisan legislation can be a stepping stone to improvement in the security of federal judges throughout the entire country,” she added.

Salas said the bill ensures her son’s death was not in vain.

“Daniel's law will make a difference. It will protect judges from senseless acts of violence.”

Similar federal legislation has been proposed in Congress.