Ruth Bader Ginsburg Reveals She's Been Receiving Chemo For 'Recurrence of Cancer' Since May

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Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, 87, is receiving chemotherapy for a "recurrence of cancer," she announced Friday.

The treatment -- which she has been receiving since May -- has led to a "significant reduction of the liver lesions and no new disease."

Her statement:

"On May 19, I began a course of chemotherapy (gemcitabine) to treat a recurrence of cancer. A periodic scan in February followed by a biopsy revealed lesions on my liver. My recent hospitalizations to remove gall stones and treat an infection were unrelated to this recurrence.

Immunotherapy first essayed proved unsuccessful. The chemotherapy course, however, is yielding positive results. Satisfied that my treatment course is now clear, I am providing this information.

My most recent scan on July 7 indicated significant reduction of the liver lesions and no new disease. I am tolerating chemotherapy well and am encouraged by the success of my current treatment. I will continue bi-weekly chemotherapy to keep my cancer at bay, and am able to maintain an active daily routine. Throughout, I have kept up with opinion writing and all other Court work.

I have often said I would remain a member of the Court as long as I can do the job full steam. I remain fully able to do that.”

Ginsburg was discharged Wednesday from a Baltimore hospital, one day after being admitted for a "possible infection," the Supreme Court of the United States said.

"Justice Ginsburg has been discharged from the hospital. She is home and doing well," said a SCOTUS spokesperson on Wednesday.

Ginsburg was admitted to Johns Hopkins Hospital early Tuesday morning after being evaluated at Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington D.C., for “fever and chills,” the court said in a release Tuesday night.

“She underwent an endoscopic procedure at Johns Hopkins this afternoon to clean out a bile duct stent that was placed last August,” the release said. “The Justice is resting comfortably and will stay at the hospital for a few days to receive intravenous antibiotic treatment.”

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