Keyshawn Johnson on D&K explains why he once had to 'really go in on' Drew Bledsoe

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Two plays before Cam Newton was stuffed from the one-yard line at the buzzer, the Patriots nearly scored a go-ahead touchdown when Newton fired a pass to the end zone that Julian Edelman couldn’t quite handle.

Appearing on The Greg Hill Show Tuesday morning, Newton said Edelman felt he like he could’ve caught it, but Newton put the blame on himself, saying “it could have been a better ball” since it “came in with a lot of heat, and it was high.”

Former NFL wide receiver and current ESPN analyst Keyshawn Johnson joined Dale and Keefe a little later on Tuesday, and said that wide receivers appreciate quarterbacks like Newton who accept responsibility and don’t try to blame others.

“Well, he’s not lying, right?” Johnson said. “Julian Edelman, that ball is coming in hot, and Julian Edelman tries to make the catch. It gets away from him. It’s not necessarily anybody’s fault. It just happens that way. But to answer your question about a quarterback protecting you, really that’s what is the truth. I mean, he’s not out there lying. The one thing that I hated in quarterbacks was for them to act like they didn’t have any wrong, they’ve never done anything wrong.”

Then Johnson shared an interesting story about a time former Patriots quarterback Drew Bledsoe acted like that when they were playing together for the Cowboys, which Johnson reacted to by making sure Bledsoe knew he didn’t like it.

“I remember when I played with Drew Bledsoe, the former New England Patriot, with the Dallas Cowboys, Drew Bledsoe threw an interception or something, and he tried to make it seem as though it was part of my fault,” Johnson said. “And I had to kind of really go in on him on the sideline, to a whole degree where, he’ll never do that again.

“You don’t ever want to have to get into those type of confrontations. Just tell the truth. Don’t try to make it seem like it’s somebody else’s fault. And I think Cam Newton being a captain of the team and owning everything on his own, that’s what winners do. That’s what winners do. Tom Brady never threw anybody under the bus. Cam Newton is doing what Cam Newton has always done.”